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Archive for February, 2012

5- Woody Woodpecker: The Survivor

Our textbook, Of Mice and Magic, mentions that Walter Lantz was a survivor (1, 159).  Lantz was a survivor for many reasons, as he owned and operated his own cartoon studio for years, obtained the best talent when it was available, and when things went south, had the ability to take things into his own […]

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Upon first glance, Winsor McCay’s Gertie the Dinosaur (1) does not have a lot going for it. The cartoon, created in 1914, is in black and white, has no vocal sound (you need to read title cards), and has inconsistent animation (the background shimmers from time to time). But despite these qualities, Gertie, even today, […]

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3- Lumière Brothers: The Beginnings of Filmed Entertainment

The first films created by the Lumière brothers were made to study what could be captured on film. The subjects of their films were the citizens of France and what they did in their day-to-day lives. The Lumière brothers filmed the people of the working class, the elites, family life, and modes of transportation (boats […]

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2- Motion in the Art of Imperial China

The world has been conveying motion in art for hundreds of years in a variety of ways. Though early works were unable to create the illusion of movement before the late 19th – 20th centuries, they were still able to show motion through important actions and movements. Here, I have a Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) painting […]

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